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Saturday, July 26, 2014

Question

My partner and I did a walk-through of a 78,200 sq. ft. medical building. Office size varies. Some office space is vacant. There are currently 22 offices occupied. Not sure what is supplied yet. I am yet to speak with the building owner. However, I would like to know what the formula is for figuring out the bid. 3 employees, myself included. They require vacuuming, mopping, dusting, wiping off counters, toilets, sink, mirrors, window sills and trash removal. Replace soap, towels in 6 public restrooms.


Answer

There is no formula. We all wish it were that easy. However, your major costs will be labor related, so letís talk about that.
78,200/3 gives you 26,067 sq. ft. to be covered by each of the 3 workers. Each of the 3 would then be responsible for 3258 sq. ft. each hour of an 8 hour shift. In my opinion, this is a bit high a production rate for medical, but I cannot be dogmatic on that because I have no idea of what is open hallway and what is congested space with high usage. I donít know what floor covering is where. I have no idea of the traffic in and out of the facility.
If you pay $12 per hour for labor, your nightly charge will be $288 for 24 (8x3) man-hours each day. That works out to $1440 a week for just your labor. Add for overhead, equipment and supplies, supervision fees, travel expenses, insurance, profit, and whatever else is need to cover business costs.
You need to measure the actual cleanable area of each room and public area and determine the floor covering and usage. Get the real measurements, not a total off someoneís notes.
Some areas will clean at the above rate and even faster. Others will require more time, and project work is never done in the thousands of sq. ft. per hour as with general cleaning.
Paper and restroom supplies should be provided by the facility or by you on a cost plus basis. Their usage is very hard to estimate without historical data.

In short, put together much more information on this project before you make a bid. You do not want to offer a low price that will force you to do inferior work to cover the project.
Lynn E. Krafft, ICAN/ATEX Editor
lekrafft@juno.com